Sep 3, 2015

Calendar of events

Disclaimers, denials, and definitions: This calendar is for events in central Indiana. Please confirm events using the contact info before traveling. Not responsible for canceled or discontinued events. All listings are in Indianapolis, unless otherwise noted. Bookmark this page, which will update periodically.

To submit: To list your poetry event, email JL Kato at jl.kato@sbcglobal.net. Write "Poetry event" in the subject line and leave a phone number or email address for follow-up. Allow four weeks for submitted items to appear.


Corrections and comments: Send to the email listed above.

Ongoing events and permanent displays: http://jlkato.blogspot.com/2015/07/public-poetry-museums-and-displays-in.html


Calls for submissions to local journals and contests: http://jlkato.blogspot.com/2015/08/to-include-your-call-for-submissions-to.html

Last updated 9/3/15. Added event on Nov. 21.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thursday, Sept. 3

6:30-8:30 p.m.
Poetry on Brick Street presents J.T. Whitehead at SullivanMunce Clutiral Center, 225 W. Hawthorne St., Zionsville. An open mic follows. Free. http://www.brickstreetpoetry.org.


7 p.m.-9 p.m.
 Poetry Open Mic at 10 Johnson Ave every Thursday on the deck of Irving Theatre. Free. 


7 p.m.-9 p.m. Kafe Kuumba, sponsored by Midtown Writers Association. Open mic at the Harris Brook Center, 4002 Cornelius Ave. Every Thirsday. $5, but $3 to open mic participants. Info: (317) 895-4919.

8 p.m. Open Mic Night at Books and Brews, 9402 Uptown Drive, Suite 1400. Poets are welcome to share the mic with other performers. Information: brad@booksnbrews.com (317) 288-5136. Every Thursday.

Friday, Sept. 4

Today is Thomas Hastings's birthday.


9 p.m.-11 p.m. The Green House Affect, an open mic, at Geneva's Barber and Beauty, 3041 E. 38th St. $10, includes food, wine, and soda. Meets every other Friday. For info: 317-443-2608.


Saturday, Sept. 5

10 a.m.-6 p.m.The Spoken Word Stage at the Fourth Street Festival, Fourth and Dunn streets, Bloomington. Free. Schedule of readers:     

      10:30     Storyzilla (storytelling)
      11:00     Tony Brewer (poetry)
      11:30     Joan Hawkins (fiction/creative nonfiction)
      12:00     Patsy Rahn (poetry)
      12:30     B-ton Storytellers Guild (storytelling)
       1:00      Fig Tree Fellowship Radio Players (audio theatre)
       2:00      Abegunde (fiction)
       2:30      Jack Ramey (poetry)
       3:00      Bloomington High School South Poetry Out Loud (poetry)
       3:30      Eric Rensberger (poetry)
       4:00      5 Women Poets (poetry)
       4:30      Andrew Hubbard (poetry)
       5:00      Tom Hastings (poetry)
  

       5:30      Frida Westford (poetry)

Also, a Poetry on Demand table will take donations in exchange for a customized poem.

 www.writersguildbloomington.com or 812-575-0484.


Sunday, Sept. 6

10 a.m.-6 p.m.The Spoken Word Stage at the Fourth Street Festival, Fourth and Dunn streets, Bloomington. Free. Schedue of readers:
      10:00     Storyzilla (storytelling)
      10:30     Claire Arbogast (fiction)
      11:00     JL Kato (poetry)
      11:30     Shayne Laughter (fiction)
      12:00     Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship (poetry)
      12:30     Shakespeare’s Monkey (poetry band)
       1:00      David Watters (poetry)

       1:30      Arbutus Cunningham (storytelling)
       2:00      Shawna Rodenberg (poetry)
       2:30      Adam Henze (poetry)

       3:00      Barb Shoup (fiction)
       3:30      Jason Ammerman (poetry)
       4:00      James Dorr (horror fiction)
       4:30      Lisa Kwong (poetry/personal essay)

Also, a Poetry on Demand table will take donations in exchange for a customized poem.

www.writersguildbloomington.com or 812-575-0484.


Tuesday, Sept. 8

2 p.m.-4 p.m. 
Calvin Fletcher's Coffee Co., 647 Virginia Ave.
 Poets meet for informal conversation and structured critiques. Free. Meets every Tuesday. Info: JL Katojl.kato@sbcglobal.net or 317-938-7026.


Thursday, Sept. 10

7 p.m.-9 p.m. Poetry Open Mic at 10 Johnson Ave every Thursday on the deck of Irving Theatre. Free.

7 p.m.-9 p.m. Kafe Kuumba, sponsored by Midtown Writers Association. Open mic at the Harris Brook Center, 4002 Cornelius Ave. Every Thirsday. $5, but $3 to open mic participants. Info: (317) 895-4919.

8 p.m. Open Mic Night at Books and Brews, 9402 Uptown Drive, Suite 1400. Poets are welcome to share the mic with other performers. Information: brad@booksnbrews.com (317) 288-5136. Every Thursday.


Poetry landmarks in central Indiana

Note: All addresses are for Indianapolis, unless otherwise stated.

If you know of a landmark, send its location to jl.kato@sbcglobal.net and place "Poetry landmark" in the title field. The landmark must be a poetry display or a marker that refers to a poet or his/her accomplishment.


Last updated 9/3/15. New listing in the visual art section.


Cemetery

Crown Hill Cemetery, 700 W. 38th St.: Grave sites of James Whitcomb Riley, Etheridge Knight, Meredith Nicholson, and Sarah T. Bolton. Maps available at main office. 
(317) 925-3800


Museums and Homes

Indiana Humanities, 1500 N. Delaware St., is the home of Meredith Nicholson. Info: (317) 638-1500 or http://indianahumanities.org/about-us/meredith-nicholson-house/

James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home and Visitor Center, 528 Lockerbie St., Indianapolis, (317) 631-5885. Info:  http://www.rileykids.org/about/riley-museum-home/?referrer=https://www.google.com/#.VZ_i4vlVhBc


James Whitcomb Riley Boyhood Home and Museum, 250 W. Main St., Greenfield, (317) 462-8539. Info: http://www.jwrileyhome.org/


Public Poetry

Cottage Home Neighborhhood features "Cottage Home," by Thomas Alan Orr, in a display at a pocket park on the 700 block of Dorman Street (south of St.Clair St.).

Indianapolis Cultural Trail features seven bus stops designed by architect Donna Sink, with poetry from local residents. The bus stops and their poems are:

  • Virginia Avenue near Woodlawn Avenue (outside of Naisa Pan Asian Restaurant): "The Painters," by Richard Pflum
  • Virginia Avenue near McCarty Street (outside of Chilly Water Brewing Co.): "Invisible Moments," by Karen Kovacik
  • Virginia Avenue near Lexington Avenue (just outside of the Mozzo Apartments): "The Bowl of Possible Peas," by John Sherman
  • Washington Street near the Indiana State Museum and Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art: "Settlement," by Micah Ling
  • Washington Street, west of Illinois Street and the Indianapolis Artsgarden: "Circle, Circle," by Mitchell L.H. Douglas
  • Massachusetts Avenue at Walnut and Park streets: "Art With a Heart," by Vienna Wagner
  • Massachusetts Avenue, east of College Avenue: "Our Street in Endless Circles," by Jenny Brown


  • Poet's Place, on Alabama Street, between Vermont and New York streets, in front of Fresco Italian Sandwich Shoppe, was designated in honor of Jim Shackleford, the Cultural Trail's unofficial poet. "City Generation," by Elizabeth Weber, is displayed here.
     Info: http://indyculturaltrail.org/ictart/poets-place/

Indianapolis International Airport, 7800 Col. H. Weir Cook Memorial Drive, features stained-glass window art by Martin Donlin, which has words and lines of poems from five Indiana writers. (317) 487-9584.

     Along Concourse A are:
  • Night, with poem "Echoes," by Ruthelen Burns
  • Midnight Flight, with poem by Joyce Brinkman
  • Back in Indiana, with poem by Norbert Krapf
     In Concourse B is:
  • Indiana Flight, with poem by Joseph Heithaus
     Note: No information on Jeannie Deeter Smith's poem.

     Photos: 
http://martindonlin.com/portfolio/new-indianapolis-airport-indiana-usa/

Indianapolis-Marion County Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St., features Arlon
 Bayliss' artwork using dichronic
 glass.
 
Light,
 Words,
 Life,
 located
 in
 the
 upper
 parking
 garage
 elevator
 lobby,
 features
 a 
poet
 written
 by
 Joyce 
Brinkman.

 (317) 275-4100.

Terre Haute: Max Erhmann at the Crossroads, by Bill Wolfe, at the intersection of Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute. Visitors can pose and sit on a bench with Max. Also, excerpts from his most famous poem, "Desiderata," appear on plaques embedded in the plaza. Photos and info:  http://wabashvalleyartspaces.com/maxview1.html

Word Hunger was a project of Brick Street Poetry to encourage a discussion of food production. Poems and artwork were placed on barns and agricultural buildings throughout the state, Sponsored by Indiana Humanities.
  • Putnam County (near Crawfordsville): Joseph Heithaus' poem "What Grows Here" appears on a barn on West County Road Road 125 South. Painted by Ken Torr. http://www.bannergraphic.com/story/1674013.htm
  • Other site descriptions to come. (See note at bottom.)


Sep 2, 2015

Branches Magazine/September-October

Poets appearing in Branches this month are Frederick Michaels, Denise C. Buschmann, Christopher Tolle, Miranda Maureen Marsico, and Jared Carter.

Info: branches.com


Local calls for submissions

To include your local call for submissions to publications, contests, etc., send the information to jl.kato@sbcglobal.net. Write "Poetry" in the subject heading. Allow up to four weeks for your notice to appear.

You may bookmark this page to check for updates.

Last updated 9/2/15.


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Ongoing / Flying Island

 
https://indianawriters.submittable.com/submit


Ongoing / Punchnel's

  http://www.punchnels.com/guidelines/

Ongoing / Tipton Poetry Journal

 http://tiptonpoetryjournal.com/submission.html


Deadline: Sept. 15 / Dream Indy Community Poem


    Dreams exist in a variety of forms. There are the dreams we have when thinking of the future. We dream of traveling to Ireland or Africa, we dream of starting a band, or we dream of a just society.       
   Then there are the dreams we have while sleeping. Sometimes we dream of silly things that don’t make sense, and sometimes a dream might fill us with positive energy. Other times our nightmares fill us with fear or embarrassment.    Lastly, there are the sort of dreams we have when daydreaming—perhaps we fantasize, we take a break from the everyday and create a world and characters, we write a play or a poem. Many writers, both past and present, have written about dreams:

    In his “March on Washington” speech, Martin Luther King writes:

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not
be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.


    In her poem “it was a dream,” Lucille Clifton writes:


in which my greater self
rose up before me accusing me
of my life
with her extra finger
whirling in a gyre of rage
at what my days had come to.
what,
i pleaded with her, could i do,
oh what could i have done?
and she twisted her wild hair
and sparked her wild
eyes and screamed as long as
i could hear her
This. This. This.


    In Act IV, Scene 1 of The Tempest, Shakespeare writes:


We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.


    Whatever kind of dream you are interested in, we invite you to dream with the above writers in verse, adding your visions and ideas on Dream in a line or two of verse. Submitted lines will be crafted into one or more community poems for display at the downtown Indianapolis Artsgarden as part of Spirit and Place 2015.

    Submit a line or two of verse on the topic of Dream to DreamIndyPoem@gmail.com

    The completed poem will be unveiled at the Indianapolis Artsgarden on Friday, Nov. 13.

Deadline: Sept. 30 / 411 Project from the Indiana Poet Laureate



From Indiana Poet Laureate George Kalamaras:

Dear Lovers of Poetry,

Announcing Project 411! I am inviting you all to participate in a great new adventure—a collaborative poem project.

We all have a well of creativity in us—so poets AND non-poets may participate. Continue to read on, and then stretch yourself and try something new!

As you may know, the Wabash River, a symbol of our state, is a 503 mile long river, 411 miles of which flow freely from where it is dammed. Here’s an excerpt from my introduction to The Wabash Watershed website:

Rivers have always intrigued me, in part because they mirror the intricate, interconnected movements of our world.

As a poet, I can’t resist the Wabash as a metaphor of free-flowing power and connection . . .

I trust you’ve noticed the subtitle, Where the Rivers of Tradition Meet the Rivers of Innovation. Rivers are rarely complete in themselves. They feed something larger and—just as significantly—are fed by many tributaries. . . .

So, the Wabash is fed by many tributaries. So it is with poetry and poets. It is the small, seemingly invisible, currents that form something larger. We are all part of something much larger than the individual could ever be. As “tributaries” we feed that “something larger,” and in the process become it, flowing into it. If we are the Eel River, as just one example, we maintain that individual identity, yet we flow into the Wabash, contributing to a great movement no individual could ever achieve alone.

Thus, I am inviting you to participate in helping write a large freely flowing river-of-a-poem. Here’s what I invite you each to do:

  1. send six poetic lines or sentences, making each as imagistic a line of poetry as possible;
  2. number each and list them separately from one another (they need not connect to one another but should read as six individual separate lines of poetry);
  3. Not sure where to begin? The following are three different strategies you are free to employ, though you are certainly not bound to follow any of these:
    1. construct the line as noun, verb, object, with intervening words, if you’d like (“The hermit ate some cold biscuits with his tea”); or
    2. you might write a line that includes a color in an unusual context (i.e., “We stepped in from the rain and watched the dieffenbachia in the living room bleed orange milk”); or
    3. you might write a line that includes a paradox (i.e. “So it is that I love pre-dawn night”)
  4. Remember, you may ignore these strategies and follow your OWN line/sentence constructions!
  5. Your contribution of six individual lines of poetry needs to be submitted in ONE Word document and needs to include your name, and BOTH your city and county of residence. If you currently don’t live in Indiana, include a short sentence describing your sustained connection to Indiana (perhaps you grew up in Indiana and have moved out of state, or you lived in Indiana for three important years of your life?).

I will make every attempt to include at least one line from everyone (though no guarantees), with the hope that we will reach (or approximate!) 411 lines.

Those who submit will not be notified of inclusion but may read the collaborative poem on The Wabash Watershed this fall.

Individual lines in the collaborative poem will not be identified; I will provide a list of contributors at the poem’s end.

Feel free to pass this call on to fellow Indiana lovers of literature!

Your contributions are due September 30, 2015—earlier, if possible.



Deadline: October 2 / 2015 Art, Poetry and Creative Writing Competition


     Hamilton Center Inc. invites middle through high school students and the general public to participate in the 2015 Art, Poetry and Creative Writing Competition.      Artists and writers from all 10 Hamilton Center counties in Indiana are encouraged to participate. The artwork must be original and created with the theme, "Light the Way," in relation to understanding and accepting mental illness.     The Hamilton-served counties include Clay, Greene, Hendricks, Marion, Owen, Parke, Putnam, Sullivan, Vermillion and Vigo.     All participants will have their artwork or writing displayed at the HCI Annual Dinner at Hulman Center on Oct. 27. The top winner in each category will receive an award package and an invitation to bring a guest to the dinner.
     Entries must be received by Oct. 2 and should include a 2015 Light the Way entry form.        Forms and additional information can be found at www.hamiltoncenter.org or by contacting Stacey Totten at 812-231-8314 or stotten@hamiltoncenter.org.

     Hamilton Center is a community mental health center that provides behavioral healthcare, wellness and human development services.


NEW LISTING! Deadline: Oct. 10 / Branches

    Theme: Abundance. Send poems to editor@branches.com. Info: branches.com/submissions or (317) 253-7752.



Women's Veterans' Wartime Memoirs workshop

CORRECTION: The workshop will begin Oct. 6.

Women Veterans’ Wartime Memoirs: A Writing Workshop


Women veterans of all ages are invited to join this free memoir-writing workshop designed to help them craft their military stories through prose or poetry.

Led by Shari Wagner, a published writer and instructor for the Indiana Writers Center, each two-hour session will include prompts and models, in-class writing activities, discussion, and feedback.

Women at all levels of writing experience are welcome.  It’s only necessary that they have the desire to develop their writing skills and share their stories. Workshops will be the first and third Tuesdays of the month at The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library, 340 N. Senate Ave., Indianapolis. and will run from October through March.  The dates are Oct. 6 and 20, Nov. 3 and 17, Dec. 1 and 15, Jan. 5 and 19, Feb. 2 and 16, March 6 and 20.

The best work from each veteran will be published in a book by the Indiana Writers Center and celebrated at a public reading in May. 

Contact Shari Wagner (sharimwagner@aol.com) for more details and to register. Shari’s faculty bio is available at www.indianawriters.org/pages/Shari-Wagner.

Sep 1, 2015

IU prof writes about Eugenio Montale

From the Indiana Daily Student

http://www.idsnews.com/article/2015/08/iu-professor-tries-to-crack-code-of-famous-poet

IU professor tries to crack code of famous poet



enthertz01web

By Sanya Ali



Mari Evans

From the Indianapolis Recorder:

http://www.indianapolisrecorder.com/news/local/article_2f74fcd4-4e87-11e5-819d-f7641c8d7566.html

Influential Indy Poet Mari Evans Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

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The Indianapolis Public Library Foundation has announced that poet and Indianapolis resident Mari Evans is the recipient of the 2015 Indiana Authors Award Lifetime Achievement Award. This marks only the second time an author has received this award from the Library Foundation.
Evans will join five already-announced Indiana Authors Award winners and finalists at the Indy Author Fair and Indiana Authors Award Dinner on October 10 at Central Library. The Lifetime Achievement Award allows Evans to select an Indiana library to receive a $2,500 grant on behalf of the Library Foundation. The public is invited to a celebration of Evans’ life and work will be held at 10:15 a.m. during the free Indy Author Fair.
Evans’ monumental career spans decades and has shaped women’s history, politics, music and drama. She is the author of numerous articles and children's books, and her work has been included in hundreds of anthologies and textbooks, including translations into many other languages. Much of Evans’ work focuses on the celebration of Africa and the struggles of the Civil Rights Movement, as well as other themes that bring to light the reality of the African-American experience. Evans became a well-respected figure in the Black Arts Movement during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Her impact on Africa was reflected in 1997 when the Ugandan government issued a commemorative postage stamp in her honor.
Teens are invited to participate in a special poetry workshop following Evans’ celebration at the Indy Author Fair, includes opportunities to purchase books, participate in book signings and take part in workshops and one-on-one interactions with accomplished authors. Workshops will focus on writing and publishing nonfiction books, blogging for writers, getting started with writing and writing for young authors.
The Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award recognizes Indiana authors’ contributions to the literary landscape in Indiana and across the nation. The Award is a program of the Library Foundation and is funded through the generosity of The Glick Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation.

I
Individual and full table tickets are available for the Award Dinner, a benefit for the Library Foundation. For additional information about the Indiana Authors Award and festivities, visit Indianaauthorsaward.org

Posted: Saturday, August 29, 2015 3:50 pm

Aug 28, 2015

State poet laureate invites public to submit lines for statewide collaborative poem

Deadline: Sept. 30 / 411 Project from the Indiana Poet Laureate

From Indiana Poet Laureate George Kalamaras:

Dear Lovers of Poetry,

Announcing Project 411! I am inviting you all to participate in a great new adventure—a collaborative poem project.

We all have a well of creativity in us—so poets AND non-poets may participate. Continue to read on, and then stretch yourself and try something new!

As you may know, the Wabash River, a symbol of our state, is a 503 mile long river, 411 miles of which flow freely from where it is dammed. Here’s an excerpt from my introduction to The Wabash Watershed website:

Rivers have always intrigued me, in part because they mirror the intricate, interconnected movements of our world.

As a poet, I can’t resist the Wabash as a metaphor of free-flowing power and connection . . .

I trust you’ve noticed the subtitle, Where the Rivers of Tradition Meet the Rivers of Innovation. Rivers are rarely complete in themselves. They feed something larger and—just as significantly—are fed by many tributaries. . . .

So, the Wabash is fed by many tributaries. So it is with poetry and poets. It is the small, seemingly invisible, currents that form something larger. We are all part of something much larger than the individual could ever be. As “tributaries” we feed that “something larger,” and in the process become it, flowing into it. If we are the Eel River, as just one example, we maintain that individual identity, yet we flow into the Wabash, contributing to a great movement no individual could ever achieve alone.

Thus, I am inviting you to participate in helping write a large freely flowing river-of-a-poem. Here’s what I invite you each to do:

  1. send six poetic lines or sentences, making each as imagistic a line of poetry as possible;
  2. number each and list them separately from one another (they need not connect to one another but should read as six individual separate lines of poetry);
  3. Not sure where to begin? The following are three different strategies you are free to employ, though you are certainly not bound to follow any of these:
    1. construct the line as noun, verb, object, with intervening words, if you’d like (“The hermit ate some cold biscuits with his tea”); or
    2. you might write a line that includes a color in an unusual context (i.e., “We stepped in from the rain and watched the dieffenbachia in the living room bleed orange milk”); or
    3. you might write a line that includes a paradox (i.e. “So it is that I love pre-dawn night”)
  4. Remember, you may ignore these strategies and follow your OWN line/sentence constructions!
  5. Your contribution of six individual lines of poetry needs to be submitted in ONE Word document and needs to include your name, and BOTH your city and county of residence. If you currently don’t live in Indiana, include a short sentence describing your sustained connection to Indiana (perhaps you grew up in Indiana and have moved out of state, or you lived in Indiana for three important years of your life?).

I will make every attempt to include at least one line from everyone (though no guarantees), with the hope that we will reach (or approximate!) 411 lines.

Those who submit will not be notified of inclusion but may read the collaborative poem on The Wabash Watershed this fall.

Individual lines in the collaborative poem will not be identified; I will provide a list of contributors at the poem’s end.

Feel free to pass this call on to fellow Indiana lovers of literature!

Your contributions are due September 30, 2015—earlier, if possible.

Carl Sandburg on the Indiana Dunes


"In 1958, poet Carl Sandburg wrote to Senator Douglas, 'Those (Indiana) dunes are to the Midwest what Grand Canyon is to Arizona and Yosemite is to California. They constitute a signature of time and eternity. Once lost, the loss would be irrevocable.'"

A conservationist invokes the poet in her campaign to stop the development of a mall, restaurant, bars, and a banquet center on the Indiana Dunes lakeshore. Much of the work involves renovating the dilapidated beach house.

From the Michigan City News-Dispatch (note: DNR is the Department of Natural Resources):



Happy 90th birthday, Indiana Dunes State Park! A birthday wish: DNR, break your lease with Pavilion Partners. The lease and private development are in direct conflict with, "the purpose for which state parks were established, namely, to preserve a primitive landscape in its natural condition for the public's use and enjoyment," according to the Indiana State Park Rules website.
The DNR and Pavilion Partners signed a lease, but the contract states it can be broken. The cost to break this lease will never be cheaper.
Determined conservationists have fought to protect this land for future generations for more than a century. Private commercial development, such as remodeling the Pavilion into bars, restaurants and a mini-mall, and building a banquet center would forever change the landscape and character of Indiana Dunes State Park, which has been a wildly successful attraction to our region.
In 1958, poet Carl Sandburg wrote to Senator Douglas, "Those (Indiana) dunes are to the Midwest what Grand Canyon is to Arizona and Yosemite is to California. They constitute a signature of time and eternity. Once lost, the loss would be irrevocable."
Recent budget cuts to Dunes State Park, and funneling its profits to other parks, caused the Pavilion to fall into disrepair. It would be another mistake to allow a few politically connected private investors to commercialize and ruin the peoples' treasure.
Best birthday wishes to you, Indiana Dunes State Park. Please visit DunesAction.org, get involved, and demand the DNR preserve rather than privatize our park. DNR, show us you care, break the lease.
Jessica Rosier
Union Mills

Aug 21, 2015

Poems and photograph by Roger Pfingston

Feature Story: ‘An Artist’s Images on the B-Line Trail’ — Poem and Photography by Roger Pfingston (Video)

“As I pointed out in the poem,” Pfingston says, “I’m impressed with the boldness and the talent behind much of the graffiti on the buildings south of the Patterson Drive bridge."
“As I pointed out in the poem,” Pfingston says, “I’m impressed with the boldness and the talent behind much of the graffiti on the buildings south of the Patterson Drive bridge.”
Roger Pfingston is a retired English and journalism teacher who taught at Bloomington High School North for 25 years. He has been quietly publishing his poetry and pictures in leading literary and photographic journals for five decades
BY CARMEN SIERING
Reading the titles, it’s easy to see that the subjects of Roger Pfingston’s poems are unassuming: “Farmers’ Market and the B-Line Trail,” “Flower,” “The Deer Poem.” The images he captures through his camera lens — leaves and rocks and puddles — are equally ordinary. However, in the hands of this Bloomington poet-photographer, the seemingly simple becomes sublime.

Video by Darryl Smith


- See more at: http://www.magbloom.com/2015/08/an-artists-images-on-the-b-line-trail/#sthash.B0qCOYqL.dpuf


http://www.magbloom.com/2015/08/an-artists-images-on-the-b-line-trail/