Aug 4, 2015

Author Bool Fair in Columbus

Update from Debi Stanton (8-4-15):



Current List of Authors:  Can we add your name to the list?  Space is limited.


Debi Stanton
Pastor Ray Stanton
Deborah Bowden
Dr. Karin Drummond
Barbra Heavner
Korey Woods, Illustrator
Sandy Pate
Carrie Beckort
Benjamin Denen
Randall Burton
Jerry Slauter
James Callahan




From Debi Stanton (July 2015):



Local Author Book Fair, September 19th
This event will be held at the Indiana Wesleyan College on State Road 46 West in Columbus, Indiana.  It will be highly publicized in the Republic, Libraries, other publications and there will be a sign at the road the day of the event.  Don’t miss this opportunity to sell your books!  You pay only the $30.00 table fee which helps cover the building rental expense.  Register now as spaces are limited. 
Reserve your table now for only $30.00.  Tables and Chairs will be provided.  Bring your own table coverings.  Authors, Illustrators, Publishers, and are all welcome at this event. 
Ali Elizabeth Photography will be on hand to do Author Head Shots for book jackets, advertising, etc.  You will receive 2 professional, digitally mastered head shots for only $25.00, which is less than half the normal fee.  You will receive the full print rights to your photos.  You MUST pre-register for the headshots at alielizabethphorographer@gmail.com, as spaces are limited.  You do NOT have to have a table at this Book Fair to have photos taken at this event.  Email Ali to reserve your time slot.
Casey Grant from All About You Event Planning will have a table at this event and would love to talk to you about scheduling Book Signings and other marketing events.
Register at debih7606@frontier.com.  You may pay via check or Paypal using that same email.
Send check or money order to address on the flyer below.
See below and attached

Lineup change for Poetry on Brick Street

Because of a recent hospitalization for heart issues, Joan Colby is forced to cancel her appearance at Poetry on Brick Street this Thursday (Aug. 6) at SullivanMunce Cultural Center, 225 W. Hawthorne St., Zionsville.

Replacing Colby will be John Cardwell, author of the recently published A Good Road Home: A Collection of Poems and Short Stories. His reading will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Here is a book description that appears on the Indiana Business Journal website

The Good Road Home is a book of poems and short stories by John Cardwell that delves into the interplay between place and the people and animals that live there. The book balances hard edged realism, sensitivity and good humor. It tells stories about life in Tipton County, Indiana in the heart of the rural Midwest in the 20th and 21st centuries. Through the characters in the book we learn of triumphs and tragedies, and much about ourselves. The book challenges stereotypes while expressing strong views regarding our Native American heritage, the natural environment, and how our acts as humans may affect the future.

Although The Good Road Home is the first book of poems and stories to be authored by John Cardwell, its contents will hardly be a surprise to persons that know him. Since 2009, John has been writing poetry and short stories and his work has previously appeared in the Tipton Poetry Journal, Spaces to Create, and the Blue Collar Review.

Coincidentally, this is Colby's second cancellation for a Brick Street Poetry event. She was scheduled to appear n 2014, but a broken bone forced her to cancel that event.




Calendar of events

Disclaimers, denials, and definitions: Please confirm events using the contact info before traveling. Not responsible for canceled or discontinued events. All listings are in Indianapolis, unless otherwise noted. Bookmark this page, which will update periodically.

To submit: If you want to list your poetry event, email JL Kato at
jl.kato@sbcglobal.net. Put "Poetry event" in the header and leave a phone number or email address for follow-up. Allow four weeks for submitted items to appear.


Corrections and comments: Send to the email listed above.

Ongoing events and permanent displays: http://jlkato.blogspot.com/2015/07/public-poetry-museums-and-displays-in.html

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Tuesday, Aug. 4

2 p.m.-4 p.m. Calvin Fletcher's Coffee Co., 647 Virginia Ave. Poets meet for informal conversation and structured critiques. Free. Meets every Tuesday. Info: JL Kato, jl.kato@sbcglobal.net or 317-938-7026.

8 p.m. Poetry Salon at Indiana Writers Center, 812 E. 67th St. Conversation and critiques. Free. Meets every first and third Tuesday of the month. Free Info: Richard Pflum, drahcir@indy.net or 317-356-2048.


Wednesday, Aug. 5

5 p.m.-9 p.m. The Under Construction Writing Workshop and Open Mic meets every first and third Wednesday of the month at Unity of Indianapolis, 907 N. Delaware St. $5.

8 p.m. Vibe on Wednesdays at Tantrum, 8215 Center Run Drive. Live band, poetry, art and open mic. Doors open at 7. $5. Must be 21 or older. Meets every other Wednesday. Host: Tony Styxx. Video: https://youtube/8Nzv2eXoYX4

Thursday, Aug. 6

6:30-8:30 p.m.
Poetry on Brick Street presents John Cardwell at SullivanMunce Cultural Center, 225 W. Hawthorne St., Zionsville. An open mic follows. Free. lhttp://www.brickstreetpoetry.org.


7 p.m.-9 p.m. Poetry Open Mic at 10 Johnson Ave every Thursday on the deck of Irving Theatre. Free.

7 p.m.-9 p.m. Kafe Kuumba, sponsored by Midtown Writers Association. Open mic at the Harrison Brook Center, 4002 Cornelius Ave. Every Thursday. $5, but $3 for open mic participants. Info: 317-895-4919.


Friday, Aug. 7

6 p.m.-8 p.m. Book launch for J.T. Whitehead's The Table of the Elements at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library, 340 N. Senate Ave. Whitehead is editor of So It Goes


9 p.m.-11 p.m. The Green House Affect, an open mic, at Geneva's Barber and Beauty, 3041 E. 38th St. $10, includes food, wine, and soda. Meets every other Friday. For info: 317-443-2608.

Saturday, Aug. 8

7:30-9:30 p.m. Vouched presents It's a Summer Poetry Extravaganza, featuring Adam Day, Mark Neely, and Sara Tracey at New Day Meadery, 1102 Prospect St. Music by Danni McPherrin. Free.



Sunday, Aug. 9

7 p.m. An Evening With the Muse at the Indiana Writers Center, 812 E. 67th St. No featured poet this month, but an extended open mic. Free. Info: Richard Pflum, 317-356-2048.


Monday, Aug. 10

5 p.m. Poetry Lab at Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St. Prompts and writing exercises. Meets weekly in the cafe area. Moderator: Penny Dunning. Check her Facebook page for cancellation notices.



HELEN GAYNOR: Addiction,, madness, and creativity

(The following article contains conclusions and opinion of the author, and not necessarily that of the owner of this blog.)


This is an article submitted by Helen Gaynor:


Bharathi and Kannadasan: Two Lives Cut Short by Drug Abuse

Subramania Bharathi
      Throughout history, many of the world’s greatest thinkers have been plagued by addictions to drugs and/or alcohol. Western writers such as Truman Capote (In Cold Blood, Breakfast at Tiffany’s), Yves Navarre (Le Jardin d’acclimation), and Michael Dransfield (Drugs Poems) passed away from illnesses which were complicated by their drug use, yet despite many attempts, none of them were able to successfully kick the habit in their lifetime.

      The issue of whether drugs could enhance creativity has always been subject of debate. Samuel Taylor Coleridge credited opium for enhancing his creativity. Socrates also saw “madness as a gift of the heavens,” yet many thought that rational thinking was crucial to producing memorable work. For Lamb, for instance, “The greatness of wit, by which the poetic talent is here chiefly to be understood, manifests itself in the admirable balance of all the faculties.”

      Scientific studies have shown that there is a link between creativity, mental illness and drug use, with recent findings revealing an increase in psychopathology in creative artists, specifically writer and poets. One study has shown that bipolar disorder is between 10 and 40 times more common in artists than in the general public and some of the many authors who suffered from this disorder include Hans Christian Andersen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Blake. Drug use has also been found to be more prevalent in the artistic community. In this article we discuss the tumultuous relationship with drugs of Tamil poets, Subramani Bharathi amd Kannadasan. 

The Link Between Drug Use, Creativity, Depression and Bipolarism
      Subramania Bharathi was, for many lovers of literature, the perfect writer, his work encompassing the full gamut of human emotion, as noted by biographer, Varadharajan Ramaswamy: “In the poems of Bharathi—Do you want humour? Yes there is. Do you want sorrow? Sure. Do you want ecstasy? In excess. Fury? In abundance. Consolation? Volumes and volumes. Philosophy? Paragraph after paragraph. Why prolong? What is not here?”

      Bharathi had what many consider a privileged upbringing, since his father held the post of officer at the Raja’s court. The young writer’s talent for Tamil poetry was recognized in the court, earning him the title of Bharathi. He was strongly favored by the Raja, who, oddly enough, first introduced Bharathi to opium and ganja, in an effort to improve the latter’s physique and strength. After his father’s death, Bharathi struggled to make a living as a teacher and then as the founder of the journal India (in 1906), which he used as a platform for his anti-colonial views. Bharathi was subjected to two prison terms for his political leanings. In jail, he was subject to torture and abuse, leading to anger and depression. His disillusionment with the political environment during Mahatma Gandhi’s rise led him to feel demoralized, and he found his solace in opium, which he referred to as “the rare medicine that will take me to heaven”. In his final years, his financial situation was dire, his disappointment growing when his plea for help to the Raja of Ettayapuram, was ignored. In July 1921, Bharathi visited the Triplicane Parthasarathy temple, where he was attacked by an elephant and suffered serious wounds and dysentery. However, he refused medication and died two months later. It is thought that the use of opium exacerbated the poet’s mental and physical health problems, and he died at the age of 39.

      Bharathi was not the only poet to have fallen prey to drugs; Nagaswaram Vidvan Rajaratnam Pillai also lost his life to alcoholism, while poet Kannadasan, struggled against alcoholism, despite being one of India’s most prolific writers. He penned thousands of lyrics and created scripts for more than 12 films. His religious writings are also highly regarded, as are his 40 books of poems and plays. For Kannadasan, drinking was part of a daily ritual. He would consume his first alcoholic beverage at noon, work during the day and start drinking again at midnight. When he realized he was addicted, he began injecting pethidine in an effort to “detox” himself, only to become heavily dependent on this powerful drug. Researcher, O Somasundaram, published a fascinating article in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry, noting that the writer reveals the classic blend of bipolarism, drug taking and creativity in his work: “The creative thinking processes and the hypomanic states resemble each other—fluency, rapidity and flexibility of thought and the combination of ideas or the categories of thought to form new and original connections on the other. All these features are seen in Kannadasan's works. The writer also died at a young age, at just 54, when he was visiting Chicago.

      Despite the link between creativity, “madness” and drug use, addiction can be addressed by increasing awareness of the treatments available for such medical health issues as depression and removing the associated stigma. Moreover, writers and other artists should be aware of the possible link between mental issues and creativity, to enable prompt diagnosis. Additionally, a paradigm shift is sorely needed in the world of writing and artistry, so that substance abuse and alcoholism cease to be glorified as a sign of genius and accepted as an illness that often accompany these qualities.





Aug 3, 2015

Local calls for submissions

To include your local call for submissions to publications, contests, etc., send the information to jl.kato@sbcglobal.net. Write "Poetry" in the subject heading. Allow up to four weeks for your notice to appear.

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Ongoing/Flying Island
 
https://indianawriters.submittable.com/submit

Ongoing/Punchnel's
  http://www.punchnels.com/guidelines/

Ongoing/Tipton Poetry Journal
 http://tiptonpoetryjournal.com/submission.html

Deadline: Aug. 10/Branches
    Theme:Better Angels. Send poems to editor@branches.com. Info: branches.com/submissions or (317) 253-7752.

Deadline: Aug. 31/Poetry Contest for a Cause
    Editor Stacy Savage is seeking submissions for a short verse poetry contest. Poems can be up to 20 lines and about any subject. No limit on number of entries submitted. Previously published works are acceptable. There is a $1 per poem entry fee. All proceeds will go to As Wings of Eagles, Inc. to help pay for a larger enclosure for the organization’s resident eagle, Belle.
    Send submissions, along with the entry fee and a cover sheet with name, address, email address, and titles of poems submitted, to: Short Verse Poetry Contest, 3121 Mounds Road, Anderson, Indiana, 46016. Make check payable to: Stacy Savage
    The winner will receive a copy of the 1865 antique book: Enoch Arden by Alfred Tennyson, the winning poem published in the online journal, Indiana Voice Journal, and on the poetry blog, Whispers, a 5x7 photo signed by As Wings of Eagles, Inc. of Belle, and $30.
    The contest judges are Stacy Savage and Janine Pickett. The winner will be announced on the Facebook page, Poetry Contests for a Cause, on Sept 16, 2015.

Deadline: Sept. 15/Dream Indy Community Poem 
    Dreams exist in a variety of forms. There are the dreams we have when thinking of the future. We dream of traveling to Ireland or Africa, we dream of starting a band, or we dream of a just society.       
   Then there are the dreams we have while sleeping. Sometimes we dream of silly things that don’t make sense, and sometimes a dream might fill us with positive energy. Other times our nightmares fill us with fear or embarrassment.    Lastly, there are the sort of dreams we have when daydreaming—perhaps we fantasize, we take a break from the everyday and create a world and characters, we write a play or a poem. Many writers, both past and present, have written about dreams:

    In his “March on Washington” speech, Martin Luther King writes:

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not
be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.


    In her poem “it was a dream,” Lucille Clifton writes:


in which my greater self
rose up before me accusing me
of my life
with her extra finger
whirling in a gyre of rage
at what my days had come to.
what,
i pleaded with her, could i do,
oh what could i have done?
and she twisted her wild hair
and sparked her wild
eyes and screamed as long as
i could hear her
This. This. This.


    In Act IV, Scene 1 of The Tempest, Shakespeare writes:


We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.


    Whatever kind of dream you are interested in, we invite you to dream with the above writers in verse, adding your visions and ideas on Dream in a line or two of verse. Submitted lines will be crafted into one or more community poems for display at the downtown Indianapolis Artsgarden as part of Spirit and Place 2015.

    Submit a line or two of verse on the topic of Dream to DreamIndyPoem@gmail.com

    The completed poem will be unveiled at the Indianapolis Artsgarden on Friday, Nov. 13.

Aug 2, 2015

Tipton Poetry Journal

Summer 2015 issue of Tipton Poetry Journal is available online:

http://issuu.com/tiptonpoetryjournal


Call for anthology entries to help eagle charity

Editor Stacy Savage is seeking submissions for a short verse poetry contest. Poems can be up to 20 lines and about any subject. No limit on number of entries submitted. Previously published works are acceptable. There is a $1 per poem entry fee. All proceeds will go to As Wings of Eagles, Inc. to help pay for a larger enclosure for the organization’s resident eagle, Belle.
Send submissions, along with the entry fee and a cover sheet with name, address, email address, and titles of poems submitted, to: Short Verse Poetry Contest, 3121 Mounds Road, Anderson, Indiana, 46016.
Make check payable to: Stacy Savage.
The winner will receive a copy of the 1865 antique book: Enoch Arden by Alfred Tennyson, the winning poem published in the online journal, Indiana Voice Journal, and on the poetry blog, Whispers, a 5x7 photo signed by As Wings of Eagles, Inc. of Belle, and $30.
The deadline for entries is August 31, 2015. The contest judges are Stacy Savage and Janine Pickett. The winner will be announced on the Facebook page, Poetry Contests for a Cause, on September 16.

Call for community to help draft a poem on the theme of "Dream"

Dream Indy Poem
Dreams exist in a variety of forms. There are the dreams we have when thinking of the future. We dream of traveling to Ireland or Africa, we dream of starting a band, or we dream of a just society.

Then there are the dreams we have while sleeping. Sometimes we dream of silly things that don’t make sense, and sometimes a dream might fill us with positive energy. Other times our nightmares fill us with fear or embarrassment.

Lastly, there are the sort of dreams we have when daydreaming—perhaps we fantasize, we take a break from the everyday and create a world and characters, we write a play or a poem. Many writers, both past and present, have written about dreams:

In his “March on Washington” speech, Martin Luther King writes,
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not
be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

In her poem “it was a dream,” Lucille Clifton writes,

in which my greater self
rose up before me accusing me
of my life
with her extra finger
whirling in a gyre of rage
at what my days had come to.
what,
i pleaded with her, could i do,
oh what could i have done?
and she twisted her wild hair
and sparked her wild
eyes and screamed as long as
i could hear her
This. This. This.

In Act IV, Scene 1 of The Tempest, Shakespeare writes,

We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

Whatever kind of dream you are interested in, we invite you to dream with the above writers in verse, adding your visions and ideas on Dream in a line or two of verse. Submitted lines will be crafted into one or more community poems for display at the downtown Indianapolis Artsgarden as part of Spirit and Place 2015.

Invitation: Submit a line or two of verse on the topic of Dream to DreamIndyPoem@gmail.com

Last day to enter submissions is Sept. 15. The completed poem will be unveiled at the Indianapolis Artsgarden on Friday, Nov. 13.

Read you soon.

Aug 1, 2015

Interview With Stacy Savage

Indiana Voice Journal interviews Stacy Savage and talks about her anthologies to benefit charitable causes:


http://www.indianavoicejournal.com/2015/08/poetry-conversation-and-contest-with.html?spref=fb

Jul 31, 2015

2 poets among writers at UIndy's Kellogg Writer Series lineup for 2015-16

Poets Shonda Buchanan and Adrain Matejka will visit the University of Indianapolis campus as part of the Allen and Helen Kellogg Writers Series.

  • Shonda Buchanan, who last visited Indianapolis at the Eiteljorg Museum on July 29, will return to the city on Wednesday, Sept. 23. Poet, memoirist, and fiction writer Shonda Buchanan is a culture and literary arts ambassador whose presentations, workshops, and lectures demonstrate her passion for exploring gender, ethnicity, family, heritage, landscape, environment, and ancestry. She edited 
      the poetry anthology 
      Voices from Leimert Park, and her poetry collection Who’s Afraid of Black Indians? was nominated for the Library of Virginia Literary Awards and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association Literary Awards. She has contributed to the Los Angeles Times, L.A. Weekly, The Writer’s Chronicle, and American Public Media’s Marketplace, and has been featured on National Public Radio’s Tell Me More. She is an assistant professor of English at Hampton University, where she teaches writing and editing.
    • Shonda Buchanan
    • Adrian Matejka, winner of an Indiana Authors Award, will visit Wednesday, April 13. Adrian Matejka was born in Nuremberg, Germany, and grew up in California and Indiana. His first collection of poems, The Devil’s Garden, won the 2002 New York/New England Award from Alice James Books. His second collection, Mixology, published by Penguin Books in 2009, was a winner of the 2008 National Poetry Series and a finalist for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literature – Poetry. His most recent book, The Big Smoke, received the 2014 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award, the 2014 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Lannan Foundation, and his work has appeared in leading journals and anthologies. He teaches at Indiana University in Bloomington and is working on a new collection of poems and a graphic novel.
      Adrian Matejka


    Both readings are free and at 7:30 p.m. in the Trustees Dining Room of Schwitzer Student Center, University of Indianapolis, 1400 E. Hanna Ave.

    For complete lineup of writers, go to http://news.uindy.edu/2015/07/14/kellogg-series-to-feature-acclaimed-writers/

    For information, contact Kevin McKelvey at 317-788-2018.

    Q&A with Marianne Boruch, winner of a $10,000 Indiana Author Award

    From the Purdue Exponent:

    Mariann Boruch
    http://www.purdueexponent.org/features/article_e127149a-33fb-11e5-b4b3-17ebb5e0f578.html

    Marc Hudson in Santa Fe, N.M.


    News from New Mexico:

    Teatro Paraguas has become a popular venue for poetry readings in Santa Fe. On the average two poetry readings happen each month, as well as the open-mic poetry event hosted by Santa Fe Poetry Trails the first Monday of every month. New Mexico Literary Arts, a non-profit arts organization, recently awarded Teatro Paraguas the 2015 New Mexico Literary Arts Gratitude Award.

    In August. Teatro Paraguas is proud to host two readings, featuring poets from Oklahoma and Indiana.

    On Sunday, August 23, Oklahoma poet Ken Hada will be joined by two Santa Fe poets, Gary Worth Moody and Argos MacCallum.

    Ken Hada's recent poem "Homecoming" was a finalist for the 2015 Spur Award. He is the author of Margaritas and Redfish (Lamar UP, 2013), The River White: A Confluence of Brush and Quill (Mongrel Empire, 2011), with artwork by Duane Hada, Spare Parts (Mongrel Empire, 2009)' Winner of the 2010 National Western Heritage Award, The Way of the Wind (Village Books Press 2008) and two ebooks: Contour Feathers and The Way of the Wind. A professor at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma, Ken directs the annual Ada Scissortail Creative Writing Festival.

    New Mexico poet Gary Worth Moody is a falconer (between hawks) who lives in Santa Fe with the artist and writer Oriana Rodman, two dogs, and hopefully this autumn, a passage ferruginous or red-tail hawk. Gary has worked as a forest-fire fighter, cowboy, farrier, horse trainer, and various jobs in the construction industry, which included a year in Siberia in 1993 building a town for coal-miners. He is the founder of the 1980s Lost River Poetry Workshops.
    Marc Hudson

    On Sunday, August 30 at 5:00 pm, Indiana poet Marc Hudson will read from his latest works. Marc Hudson taught for many years at Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana, where he resides. He has published a translation of Beowulf as well as three books of poetry: Afterlight, Journal for an Injured Son, and The Disappearing Poet Blues. His book length manuscript, Swimming the Acheron, was a finalist for the 2014 National Poetry Series. His awards include an NEA Fellowship in Poetry, the Juniper Prize, the Strousse Award, and the Allen Tate Prize. His poems have appeared in Poetry, The Sewanee Review, Poetry Northwest, Poet Lore and many other journals.

    UPDATE: Butler's Visiting Writers Series 2015-2016.

    According to Butler University's website, the 2015-2016 lineup of the Vivian Delbrook Visiting Writers Series will include Nikky Finney, Gerald Stern, and Anne Marie Macari. Denis Johnson, who also writes fiction, will appear. No dates announced.

    http://legacy.butler.edu/mfa-creative-writing/delbrook-series/

    UPDATE: Fall 2015 lineup announced:

    http://www.indystar.com/story/life/2015/07/29/joyce-carol-oates-among-falls-butler-visiting-writer-series/30832397/

    Jul 29, 2015

    Jenny Kander update

    Jenny Kander
    Some of you know that Jenny Kander was recently hospitalized, and she moved into Bell Trace Senior Living Community. At first, doctors thought she had a stroke, She was even diagnosed with Parkinson's. But both diagnoses were wrong. Jenny did report having migraines, one after another. She's doing fine now, but she's selling her former, three-level  residence at 2341 Winding Brook Circle.

    She has sent invitations to friends to visit from 2:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, at her new, smaller place at 800 N. Bell Trace Circle, Apartment 203, Bloomington 47408. Drop her a line.

    A poem about Eric Garner by IU prof Ross Gay

    From PBS:

    A detail you may not have known about Eric Garner blossoms in poem


    BY CORINNE SEGAL  
    July 20, 2015 at 11:09 AM EDT

    Listen to Ross Gay read “A Small Needful Fact.”

    One year and three days ago, Staten Island man Eric Garner told officers “I can’t breathe” 11 times while in a chokehold by Officer Daniel Pantaleo — his last words.

    These words and the protests that followed Garner’s death are the backdrop for “A Small Needful Fact,” a poem by Indiana University professor and poet Ross Gay. The poem drew a wide audience online, garnering thousands of shares on Facebook and Twitter. Gay, whose book “Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude” was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press this year, said the poem was based on a fact about Garner that he read in an obituary.

    Much of the press surrounding Garner has focused on the violence of his death, while the poem puts a needed spotlight on his life, Gay said. “What that poem, I think, is trying to do is to say, there’s this beautiful life, which is both the sorrow and the thing that needs to be loved,” he said.

    A Small Needful Fact
    Is that Eric Garner worked
    for some time for the Parks and Rec.
    Horticultural Department, which means,
    perhaps, that with his very large hands,
    perhaps, in all likelihood,
    he put gently into the earth
    some plants which, most likely,
    some of them, in all likelihood,
    continue to grow, continue
    to do what such plants do, like house
    and feed small and necessary creatures,
    like being pleasant to touch and smell,
    like converting sunlight
    into food, like making it easier
    for us to breathe.

    Ross Gay is a poet, professor at Indiana University and author of the collection “Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude.”

    Jul 28, 2015

    Who's Afraid of Black Indians?, a SkyBlue article by Chi Sherman

    This is the SkyBlue article, which previewed her July 29 visit to the Eiteljorg Museum::

    Who's Afraid of Black Indians? 

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